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Rambus

RIMM Image

TechWorks / MELCO INC. announce the launch of Rambus Modules (RIMM) for Motherboards with Intel's latest chipset, i820 / i840.

We are now prepared to make shipment of both sample and mass production RIMM. TechWorks / MELCO INC. is one of the few third party module manufacturers in the world (4th earliest in the world and 1st and only in Japan) who have established the preparation of RIMM and C-RIMM modules.

 

Validated RIMM Modules

Validation Summary

The following validation has been implemented on Rambus RIMM Modules. A small sample of RIMM Modules (1-2) has been tested using an HP8753E Vector Network Analyzer. For technical details on RIMM characterization, refer to the Direct RIMM Module Validation Specification.

Listed below are those RIMM Modules that have passed validation. The testing is not intended to replace normal module qualification process. Rambus does not endorse any particular vendor nor warranty the fitness for use of validated parts.

Validation Results

Last Updated March 20, 2000

Supplier

Density

Configuration

Part Number Date Code / Exceptions

       

Hyundai

64MB

128M-8Mx16

HYMR13216-845_0003

Kingston

64MB

128M-8Mx16

KVR800x16-4/64_9928

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

64MB

128M-8Mx16

RD800-64M-N0M-AA_9938

NEC

64MB

128M-8Mx16

MC-4R64CKE6B-845_9926

NEC

64MB

128M-8Mx16

MC-4R64CEE6C-845_0006

Samsung

64MB

128M-8Mx16

KMMR16R84C1-RK8_9912

Samsung

64MB

128M-8Mx16

KMMR16R84AC1-RK8_9931

Toshiba

64MB

128M-8Mx16

THMR1N4_9944

       

Centon

64MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

CE32X18-RB800_9938

Hyundai

64MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

HYMR14818-845_0003

Kingston

64MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KVR800X18-4/64_9915

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

64MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RD800-E64M-S0A-AA_9938

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

64MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RD800-E64M-TOM-AA_9939

Memory Card Technology A/S

64MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RM72R1444R-845_9952

Samsung

64MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KMMR18R84C1-RK8_9912

Samsung

64MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KMMR18R84AC1-RK8_9921

SMART

64MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

SMH072RFSAD01

SMART

64MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

SMH072RFS0D02_9926

Toshiba

64MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

THMR1E4-8US

       

Hyundai

96MB

128M-8Mx16

HYMR14816-845_0003

Kingston

96MB

128M-8Mx16

KVR800x16-6/96_9928

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

96MB

128M-8Mx16

RD800-96M-N0M-AA_9934

NEC

96MB

128M-8Mx16

MC-4R96CKE6B-845_9926

NEC

96MB

128M-8Mx16

MC-4R96CEE6C-845_9906

Samsung

96MB

128M-8Mx16

KMMR16R86C1-RK8_9912

Samsung

96MB

128M-8Mx16

KMMR16R86AC1-RK8_9931

Toshiba

96MB

128M-8Mx16

THMR1N6_9944

Viking

96MB

128M-8Mx16

R48186Z8N2-40_0003

       

Hyundai

96MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

HYMR14818-845_0003

Kingston

96MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KVR800X18-6/96_9915

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

96MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RD800-E96M-S0M-AA_9933

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

96MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RD800-E96M-S0A-AA_9938

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

96MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RD800-E96M-TOM-AA_9939

Memory Card Technology A/S

96MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RM108R1446R-845_9952

Samsung

96MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KMMR18R86C1-RK8_9912

Samsung

96MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KMMR18R86AC1-RK8_9921

SMART

96MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

SMH108RFSAD01

Toshiba

96MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

THMR1E6-8US

       

Hyundai

128MB

128M-8Mx16

HYMR16416H-845_9951

I-O Data Device

128MB

128M-8Mx16

RM800-NR45-1-128M

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

128MB

128M-8Mx16

RD800-128M-N1E-BA_0006

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

128MB

128M-8Mx16

RD800-128M-N0M-BA_9938

NEC

128MB

128M-8Mx16

MC-4R128CKE6B-845_9926

NEC

128MB

128M-8Mx16

MC-4R128CEE6C-845_0006

Toshiba

128MB

128M-8Mx16

THMR1N8_939_9943

Samsung

128MB

128M-8Mx16

KMMR16R88C1-RK8_9912

Samsung

128MB

128M-8Mx16

KMMR16R88AC1-RK8_9931

       

I-O Data Device

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RM800E-T45-1-128M

I-O Data Device

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RM800E-TR45-1-128M

Adtec Co.,Ltd

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

AD-RD8X144_9952

Dane Elec

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

DR400188128

Hyundai

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

HYMR16418H-845_0003

Infineon

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

HYR186420G

Kingmax

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

MRLA845-888

Kingston

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KVR800X18-8/128_9919

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RD800-E128M-S0M-BA_9934

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RD800-E128M-S0A-BA_9938

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RD800-E128M-TOM-BA_9939

Memory Card Technology A/S

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RM144R1448R-845_9952

Samsung

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KMMR18R88C1-RK8_9912

Samsung

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KMMR18R88AC1-RK8_9921

SMART

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

SMH144RFSAD01

SMART

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

SMH144RF0E01_9925

Toshiba

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

THMR1E8-8US

Viking

128MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

R64188Z8N2-40

       

NEC

192MB

128M-8Mx16

MC-4R192CKE6B-845_9927

Samsung

192MB

128M-8Mx16

KMMR16R8CAC1-RK8_9931

       
Dane Elec 192MB ECC 144M-8Mx18 DR4001812192

Kingston

192MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KVR800X18-12/192_9920

Samsung

192MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KMMR18R8CAC1-RK8_9930

Toshiba

192MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

THMR1E12-8US_9938

       

I-O Data Device

256MB

128M-8Mx16

RM800-NR45-1-256M

Kingston

256MB

128M-8Mx16

KVR800X16-16/256_9931

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

256MB

128M-8Mx16

RD800-256M-N1E-BA-0006

NEC

256MB

128M-8Mx16

MC-4R256CKE6B-845_9927

NEC

256MB

128M-8Mx16

MC-4R256CEE6C-845_0006

Samsung

256MB

128M-8Mx16

KMMR16R8GAC1-RK8_9931

Toshiba

256MB

128M-8Mx16

THMR1N16_939

Viking

256MB

128M-8Mx16

R1281816Z8N2-40_0003

       

Centon

256MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

CE128X18-RB800

I-O Data Device

256MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RM800E-TR45-1-256M

Kingston

256MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KVR800X18-16/256_9920

Melco Inc. "Buffalo"

256MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

RD800-E256M-TOM-BA-0006

Samsung

256MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

KMMR18R8GAC1-RK8_9930

Toshiba

256MB ECC

144M-8Mx18

THMR1E16

 

 

 



Memory tester Technology

To reach successful development of Rambus module(RIMM) and to enable the high cost performance, it is a necessity to have outstanding product developing ability and the adoption or high standard tester.

TechWorks/Melco Inc. had achieved the tester "ADVANTEST T5591" at the early stage of development, and have enabled not only the high quality control, but also the ability to make production or the Rambus module on her own.

Furthermore, with the technical cooperation with Taiwan Motherboard manufacturers, we are able to provide products with outstanding reliability and compatibility. The experience of these testing abilities are being used to enable the high quality and high cost performance of products such as VCM Memory and PC133, which are part of other next generation products.

TechWorks: The Upgrade Company

Founded in 1986, TechWorks has emerged as a leading computer upgrade company offering over 200 personal computer and workstation upgrade products for more than 2,500 computer systems. TechWorks' growth in this fast-paced, highly competitive industry has earned recognition by Inc. Magazine's 500 Fastest Growing Privately Held Companies in America on three separate occasions.

TechWorks expanded its capabilities as a major supplier of computer upgrade products in January 1998 when it was acquired by Melco, Inc., one of Japan's largest computer upgrade providers. Through the Melco partnership, TechWorks benefits from globally expanded engineering, manufacturing and supplier resources.


TechWorks Products

TechWorks has sold many millions of PowerRAM memory upgrades for a wide variety of computer systems and printers including virtually all Macs and PCs. TechWorks also markets other upgrades and peripherals including Active Matrix Flat Panel Displays.

TechWorks makes ordering easy with their extensive on-line upgrade store. Customers can also call their toll-free sales hotline at (800) 688-7466 or email sales@techworks.com.


Outrageous Customer Service

TechWorks strives to achieve 100% customer satisfaction by offering the most comprehensive service program in the industry.

  • 30-Day Money Back Guarantee
  • Unlimited Toll-Free Technical Support
  • Lifetime Limited Warranty on PowerRAM Memory Modules

TechWorks Timeline
1998 Melco partners with TechWorks to become one of the largest third party memory manufacturers worldwide.
1997 Established manufacturing facility in Ireland. Six Sigma qualified by Motorola.
1995 Opened Hong Kong office.
1994 Certified contract manufacturer for Apple Computer.
1993 Approved subcontractor for Motorola.
1992 Expanded to Europe with the purchase of a UK Co. and ranked #9 on INC. Magazine's Top 500 Fastest Growing Privately Held Companies.
1991 Ranked #4 on INC. Magazine's Top 500 Fastest Growing Privately Held Companies. Entered retail channel.
1990 Ranked #34 on INC. Magazine's Top 500 Fastest Growing Privately Held Companies.

Introduction

Rambus, Inc. (nasdaq: RMBS) is the maker of the proprietary dynamic random access memory featured by Intel for use with some of the chip titan's newer systems. This computer memory is commonly referred to as RDRAM. In recent months, despite numerous major setbacks with systems utilizing RDRAM, despite continuing exorbitant prices for this type of memory, and despite pessimistic forecasts and articles, Rambus's stock price has soared from just over $50 in December to currently well over $400.

A Little History

Founded in 1990 by Drs. Mike Farmwald, and Mark Horowitz, Rambus gained widespread notoriety in the mid-1990's when it signed a contract with the game console maker to provide the memory technology for the Nintendo64. Attracted by the bandwidth gains of the technology as well as by its proprietary nature, Intel entered into an agreement with Rambus Inc. in December 1995. This agreement was towards the development of the Rambus technology for future PC main memory. Unlike current mainstream memory that is based on open standards, this agreement will allow Intel to profit from the production Rambus RAM through lucrative licensing fees.

Although Nintendo has had a falling-out of sorts with Rambus and has no plans of using Rambus RAM in its future "Dolphin" game system, Rambus secured a significant win with the recently released Sony PlayStation2. Each PlayStation2 console contains 32 MB of Rambus RAM.

Many memory manufacturers have not been receptive to RDRAM in part because of the licensing fees and in part because of the manufacturing complexity of producing RDRAM. To coax these producers into making RDRAM, Intel has invested massive amounts of money in memory manufacturers including Micron, Infineon, and Samsung.

Several companies have agreed to produce RDRAM, although their combined output for this year will be very small in comparison to the total output of SDRAM. SDRAM, or Synchronous DRAM, is currently by far the most common type of computer memory put into systems today. RDRAM production this year might possibly even lag the production of DDR SDRAM. DDR SDRAM (Double Data Rate SDRAM) is a new extension of SDRAM technology that doubles bandwidth but has not even reached the market yet. Micron (nyse: MU), perhaps the premier manufacturer of memory products in the world, even after receiving about half a billion dollars from Intel, has been reluctant to produce RDRAM due to technical problems it sees inherent to Rambus memory. Although it looks like many may produce RDRAM later this year, Techworks has chosen to become among the first to manufacture and release RDRAM. A quick glance at Techwork's web site shows a good deal of positive information about RDRAM.

Technology in Brief

Although it has been very poorly publicized, the first thing to know about RDRAM is that there are actually three different speed grades that are being used in PCs. Although PC800 is mentioned in the media and in Intel promotional material as if it is the only type of RDRAM, it is in fact the fastest, most expensive, and rarest grade of three different speed levels of RDRAM. At the bottom of the performance ladder is PC600, which is also, as you would expect, the cheapest. It is so slow that it will probably not be used extensively by major system manufacturers in any computer systems.

In the middle of this RDRAM pack is PC700, which is a standard that was only introduced after RDRAM producers pressured Intel to accept this compromise grade. The reason this happened was because many of those producers were finding it next to impossible to reach acceptable yields at PC800. These producers also feared that falling to PC600 would result in the memory being rejected as too slow by their customers. Even though this standard was adopted a year ago, memory manufacturers are still having trouble reaching the PC800 standard today. Because of this, PC800 RDRAM is almost unattainable and most of the current systems are quietly shipping out with the slower PC700 RIMMs.

RDRAM modules

PC800 is currently the fastest RDRAM available, but it is very difficult to produce it. The so-called 'yields' of PC800 RDRAM are very low and thus it's very expensive and in low supply. PC800 RDRAM runs at a clock of 400 MHz and it uses a DDR-way of transporting the data. Thus the 16 bit or 2 byte data are transported at 800 MHz, explaining the '800' in PC800. The data bandwidth of PC800 RDRAM is 1.6 GB/s and thus double of PC100 SDRAM or 1.6 times as much as PC133 SDRAM.

The story is a bit different with PC700 and PC600. Currently the RDRAM of choice is PC700 RDRAM. It was actually invented very late last year, when it turned out that the yields of PC800 were rather low. Intel's 840 chipset is not able to use it; plugging PC700 into an i840-platform will result in the RDRAM running at PC600-spec, but i820 is able to make proper usage of PC700 RDRAM. This RDRAM-type runs at 356 MHz clock, offering around 1.4 GB/s data bandwidth.

PC600 is the cheapest and slowest RDRAM available for PCs right now, but it is still not coming at an attractive price point compared to SDRAM. If you think that PC600 stands for 300 MHz you're dead wrong. PC600 RDRAM runs at 266 MHz, resulting in a data bandwidth of 1.066 GB/s, which is identical to the data bandwidth of PC133 SDRAM.

For Intel's Coppermine based systems, there is one final important issue to consider in regard to bandwidth. Coppermine's data bus is 64-bits wide, but only operates at 133 MHz. This means that it has the same effective bandwidth as PC133 SDRAM of 1.064 GB/sec. Because of this bottleneck, much of the bandwidth advantage that RDRAM has over SDRAM is lost. There is still a theoretical advantage when DMA (Direct Memory Access) requests and AGP transfers are issued simultaneously with processor requests, but our tests show that this is not enough to help RDRAM above its other problems.

 

Intel 820 chips

Intel's new chipset, that supports the 'Coppermine'-processor, was first known under the code name 'Camino'. Its the first PC-chipset to support Rambus or RDRAM. RDRAM was and still is not exactly popular in the industry, because Rambus Inc. owns the design and so each memory maker producing RDRAM has to pay royalties to Rambus Inc. Intel didn't bother about that, since history had proven that whatever Intel proclaimed as the future direction was finally accepted by the world. Unfortunately however, the Force had left the designers of Camino. The effect was rather devastating. 'Camino', is today known as 'Intel 820' chipset.

Intel has developed the next-generation platform for an incredible PC experience, both on and off the Internet. The new Intel® 820 chipset was designed to optimize the performance of the Intel® Pentium® III processor, with superior buffering and deeper pipelining for a stable, long-life platform.

A Revolution in Chipset Technology
The 820 chipset supports the RDRAM* memory technology, 133-MHz system bus, and delivers significant graphics performance enhancements through the 4X capability of the AGP 2.0 Interface Specification.

  • The 82820 Memory Controller Hub (MCH) provides the CPU interface, DRAM interface, and AGP interface in the 820 chipset platform. The MCH supports a single processor (82820) or two processors with up to 1 GB of memory (82820DP).

  • The 82801 I/O Controller Hub (ICH) utilizes Intel® Hub Architecture to make a direct connection from the graphics and memory to the integrated AC97 controller, the ATA66 controller, dual USB ports, and PCI add-in cards.

  • The 82802 Firmware Hub (FWH) stores system BIOS and video BIOS, as well as the Intel® Random Number Generator (RNG). The Intel RNG provides truly random numbers to enable stronger encryption, digital signing, and security protocols. This baseline security is provided across Intel's entire 800 chipset series product line.
The latest features and Intel-lead technology initiatives make the Intel 820 chipset a true revolution in chipset technology.
  • The Intel® Hub Architecture provides twice the bandwidth of the PCI bus at 266 MB per second. This allows a wider flow of rich information from the I/O controller to the memory controller. With optimized arbitration rules, more functions run concurrently, enabling more life-like audio and video.

Asus P3C-L with Asus DIMM Riser II
ASUS P3C-L with Dimm Riser Installed

The DIMM-Riser can be plugged into a RIMM-slot and then you can put PC100 SDRAM into the riser-card. It's the same thing as an onboard 'MTH'-chip.

Asus DIMM Riser II
Asus Dimm Riser

VIA Apollo Pro 133A

VIA Apollo Pro 133A chipset

The Apollo Pro 133A scored very well versus Intel's 820-chipset, almost reaching the same performance in most benchmarks. Competing against 'Caminogate' however is not the same as competing against the once famous BX-chipset. Apollo Pro 133A will have to show if its PC133 SDRAM-interface is up to competing against the so far best SDRAM chipset ever designed. I will only give this new VIA chipset my final blessing if it can live up to BX. If VIA has still not achieved that, it should send its engineers back to the drawing board. 

Introduction
The VIA Apollo Pro Plus is a high performance chipset for Slot 1/Socket 370 mobile and desktop PC systems. To provide the highest level of flexibility to mainboard and system designers aiming to reach every market segment, Apollo Pro Plus incorporates the full range of cutting-edge core logic technologies. These include advanced system power management capability for both desktop and mobile PC applications, PC100 SDRAM, AGP 2x mode, and multiple CPU/DRAM timing configurations.

Configurations
The VIA Apollo Pro Plus consists of two devices. The VT82C693 combines with the new VT82C596A, a BGA-packaged southbridge with a full set of mobile power management features for high performance, power-conscious desktop and mobile designs.

FEATURES:

VT82C693 North Bridge

  • Supports all Slot 1 (Intel Pentium ® II) and Socket 370 (Intel Celeron ®) processors
  • AGP / PCI / ISA Mobile and Deep Green PC Ready
  • 66 / 100 MHz CPU external bus speed (internal 450MHz and above)
  • AGP v1.0 and PCI 2.1 compliant
  • Supports SideBand Addressing (SBA) mode
  • Concurrent CPU and AGP access
  • Supports FP, EDO, and SDRAM
  • Different DRAM types may be used in mixed combinations
  • Supports 8 banks up to 1GB DRAM
  • 5-2-2-2-2-2-2-2 back-to-back accesses for EDO DRAM
  • 6-1-1-1-2-1-1-1 back-to-back accesses for SDRAM
  • Pipelined transfers up to 533 MB/sec
  • Supports up to five PCI masters
  • WindowsTM 95 OSR-2 VXD and integrated WindowsTM 98 / NT5 miniport driver support
VT82C596A South Bridge
  • PC98-Compatible Mobile Power Management: Supports both ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power Interface) and legacy (APM) power management
  • Sideband signal support for PC/PCI and serial interrupt for docking and non-docking applications
  • Supports external APIC interface for symmetrical multiprocessor configurations
  • USB v.1.0 and Intel Universal HCI v.1.1 compatible
  • Microsoft WindowsTM 95 and plug and play BIOS compliant
  • Supports ATAPI compliant devices including DVD devices
  • Integrated USB Controller, UltraDMA-33 master mode and EIDE controller
 Product Reference Table
 Technical Documentation 
 Chip
 
 Datasheet
 (These files require Adobe Acrobat®)
 Northbridge
 VT82C693 North Bridge Controller
 The VT82C693 can be paired with either the Mobile or Super Southbridge:
   Mobile South  VT82C596A South Bridge Controller
   Super South  VT82C686A South Bridge Controller
 Technical Support
 Drivers  IDE, AGP and IRQ Drivers
 Resources
 Chipset Comparison  Slot 1 Feature Comparison
 Motherboard Info  Pro Plus-based Motherboards
 News Release  VIA Introduces New Slot1/Socket 370 Core Logic 12/24/98
 Press Coverage  Apollo Pro Plus in the News
 Product Photo  Apollo Pro Plus with Mobile South
 

 

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